Golden Oldies Juke Box Saturday Night
Golden Oldies Juke Box Saturday Night 24
May 9, 2015
Golden Oldies Juke Box Saturday Night
Golden Oldies Juke Box Saturday Night 25
May 16, 2015

From Glenn Miller to Nino and The Ebb Tides

"Juke Box Saturday Night" by Nino and doo wop group The Ebb Tides

Juke Box Saturday Nights

The song “Juke Box Saturday” night, which has been recorded by many artists, initially by Glenn Miller and then in the era we cover by Nino & The Ebb Tides, is the epitome of a golden oldies — and contains references to golden oldies within it.

“Juke Box Saturday Night” was written by Al Stillman, the famous lyricists who wrote songs for many artists of the day including Perry Como and Johnny Mathis, and Paul McGrane. It was first recorded by Glenn Miller & His Orchestra. This song told the story of kids having fun when cash is in short supply, making a soda last all night and listening to their favorite hits. The juke box provides the music, and many people share the cost by supplying the dimes for the songs. Both versions feature parody clips of the current generation’s popular artists. The Glenn Miller version lampoons Harry James and The Ink Spots, for example. The cover by Nino & The Ebb Tides, a doo wop group, parodies The Monotones and The Silhouettes. In the spirit of saving cash, The Daily Doo Wop features free music downloads.

Glenn Miller and His Orchestra (1942)

“Juke Box Saturday Night” was Glenn Miller’s last hit as a civilian. With World War II being the big news of the day, Miller enlisted shortly after this record was released. On December 5, 1942, the song went into the Billboard Top Ten at #9. Miller was transferred from the Army to the Army Air Corps and became Captain Glenn Miller. He auditioned recruits from all of the U.S. for a military that would play modern, popular music to the troops. They became the Army Air Force Band. They existed for 14 months and played in 11 countries overseas. They are credited with more than 500 radio broadcasts, did more than 300 personal appearances, and were involved with more than 900 morale-boosting drives for those in garrison areas and combat zones. Miler believed that music helped the fight, and said, “America means freedom and there’s no expression of freedom quite so sincere as music.” The video clip features The Modernaires.

Here are the lyrics:

“Sippin’ up soda pop rickeys
To our hearts delight
Dancin’ to swingeroo quickies
Jukebox Saturday night

Goodman and Kyser and Miller
Help to make things bright
Mixin’ hot licks with vanilla
Jukebox Saturday night

They put nothin past us
Me and honey lamb
Making one Coke last us
Till it’s time to scram

Money, we really don’t need that
We make out alright
Lettin the other guy feed that
Jukebox Saturday night

After sippin’ a soda, we got a scheme
Somebody else plays the record machine
It’s so easy to say pet names
When you listen to the trumpet of Harry James

We love to hear that tenor croon
Whenever the Ink Spots sing a tune
If I didn’t know why the roses grow
Then I wouldn’t know why the roses grow

Now listen, honey child
If I didn’t know, all them little things
I’m supposed to know
Then I sure would be a sad man
If I didn’t know

Money, we really don’t need it
We’ll make out alright
Lettin’ the other guy feed that
Jukebox Saturday night”

Nino & The Ebb Tides (1961)

Nino & The Ebb Tides were a vocal quartet from The Bronx, NY. They started singing together in 1956 and had a few of minor hits. In 1961, they covered the Glenn Miller tune “Juke Box Saturday Night,” updating the “swingaroo” references to the newer doo wop, rock and roll artists. Although the record only reached #57 nationally, it was a hit in regional areas, including New York City, and is considered by many to be a classic. Group members for the song were Antonio Aiello (lead), Vinnie Drago (bass), Tony DiBari (tenor), and Tony Imbimbo (baritone).

Here are the lyrics:

“Moppin’ up soda pop rickeys
To our heart’s delight
Rockin’ and rollin’ my baby
Jukebox Saturday night

Domino, Checker and Presley
Help to make things bright
Rockin’ and rollin’ my baby
Jukebox Saturday night
Oh-oh Jukebox Saturday night

They sing nothin’ to us
Me and Barbara Ann
Making one Coke do us
Till it’s time to scram

Money well we really don’t need it
We’ll make out alright L
ettin’ the other guy feed that
Jukebox Saturday night
Oh-oh Jukebox Saturday night

Sippin’ a soda we got a scheme
Somebody else plays the record machine
It’s so easy to reminisce
When you listen to The Monotones singing this

“I wonder wonder who, be do do who
Who wrote the book of love
Chapter 1 says you love her, you love her with all your heart
Chapter 2 you tell her you’re never never never never ever gonna part
In Chapter 3 remember the meaning of romance
In Chapter 4 you break up won’t you give her just one more chance
I wonder wonder who, be do do who
Who wrote the book of love”

Sippin’ a soda we got a scheme
Somebody else plays the record machine
It’s so easy to reminisce
When you listen to The Silhouettes singing this

“Yip yip yip yip yip yip yip yip
Sha na na na, sha na na na na,
Sha na na na, sha na na na na,
Sha na na na, sha na na na na,
Sha na na na, sha na na na na,
Yip yip yip yip yip yip yip yip
Mum mum mum mum mum mum
Get a job Sha na na na, sha na na na na”

Money well we really don’t need it ”
We’ll make out alright
Lettin’ the other guy feed that
Jukebox Saturday night
Oh-oh Jukebox Saturday night
Oh-oh Jukebox Saturday night”

For More Golden Oldies Music

The Daily Doo Wop Rec Room has daily featured doo wop, rock and roll, R&B, or rockabilly songs that were hits during the first era of rock and roll (that is, from about 1952 until the British invasion in 1964). After a song is featured, it then goes into the juke box. You are welcome to listen to any of the 40+ selections there. Every weekend, there is a Golden Oldies Juke Box Saturday, and the juke box is full of song requests from the 1950s and 1960s.

Please click here for our Daily Doo Wop YouTube channel, to which you can subscribe. Thank you for stopping by The Daily Doo Wop.

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