Recroom

=

Pop Music

By 1962, Neil Sedaka already had eight Top-10 hits, but this was his first time at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song was successful internationally  and has been widely covered (e.g., Paul Anka, Dee Dee Sharp, The Carpenters, Gloria Estefan, Lenny Welch, and more).  "Breaking Up is Hard to Do" in 1962 went to #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, #12 on the Hot R&B Sides chart, and #7 in the U.K. Sedaka himself re-recorded it as a ballad in 1975, and it also charted well internationally.

Even though the song, co-written by Sedaka and Howard Greenfield, talks about breaking up, Sedaka married his longtime sweetheart Leba Strassberg  soon after the original release of the record. They are still married.

Sedaka is a singer, pianist, composer, and record producer. He has written or co-written more than 500 songs. Sedaka tours and performs around the world.

Here are the lyrics to "Breaking Up Is Hard to Do" by Neil Sedaka:

"Doo doo doo down dooby doo down down
Come ah come ah down dooby doo down down
Come ah come ah down dooby doo down down
Breaking up is hard to do.

Don't take your love away from me
Don't you leave my heart in misery
If you go then I'll be blue
'Cause breaking up his hard to do

Remember when you held me tight
And you kissed me all through the night
Think of all that we've been through
And breaking up is hard to do

They say that breaking up is hard to do
Now I know, I know that it's true
Don't say that this is the end
Instead of breaking up I wish that we were making up again

I beg of you, don't say goodbye
Can't we give our love another try
Come on baby, let's start a new
'Cause breaking up is hard to do

They say that breaking up is hard to do
Now I know, I know that it's true
Don't say that this is the end
Instead of breaking up I wish that we were making up again

I beg of you, don't say goodbye
Can't we give our love another try
Come on baby, let's start a new
'Cause breaking up is hard to do"

For another song by Neil Sedaka: "Calendar Girl."

For More Golden Oldies Music                                

The Daily Doo Wop Rec Room has daily featured doo wop music, rock and roll hits, R&B, or rockabilly songs that werewere hits during the first era of rock and roll (that is, from about 1952 until the British invasion in 1964). After a song is featured, it then goes into the juke box. You are welcome to listen to any of the 40+ selections there. Every weekend, there is a Golden Oldies Juke Box Saturday Night, and the juke box is full of song requests from the 1950s and 1960s.

Please click here for the Daily Doo Wop YouTube channel, to which you can subscribe. Thank you for stopping by The Daily Doo Wop. Hope you enjoyed "Breaking Up Is Hard to Do" by Neil Sedaka.

The Rec Room has a featured song on the record player, 150+ songs in the juke box, and there are several Classic TV selections, as follows:

  1.  Make Room for Daddy, Season 2, Episode 1 titled “Family Troubles’ first aired September 28, 1954. As always, Danny Williams a successful nightclub singer, tries to balance his home and work wife. The show stars Danny Thomas, Jean Hagen, Sherry Jackson, Rusty Hamer, Louise Beavers, and Jesse White.The show was sponsored by Pall Mall cigarettes and Dodge. Commercials included. Running time: 29:30.
  2.  Clip from The Jack Paar Show from September 31, 1960. The show stars Jack Paar as host, of course. The guests are Charley Weaver, Hermione Gingold, and Shelley Berman. Running time 19:46.
  3. Mickey Mouse appears in Walt Disney’s animated short “Haunted House.” This was made in 1929. Cartoons and short films from earlier decades were often shown on TV in the 1950s, particularly in programming for children. Running time: 6:47.
  4.  Vintage (circa 1952) commercial for Wonder Breads. “Help Build Strong Bodies 8 Ways.” Running time: 1:00.

The Daily Doo Wop is a time machine to the first era of rock and roll. This starts around 1952 with the Eisenhower administration and goes until those longhaired Brits The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in February, 1964, and the music began to change. During this time of the 1950s and early 1960s, doo wop music, with its beautiful vocal harmonies, lyrics about love, and a host of nonsense syllables thrown in, was a signature sound. It was an exciting period in popular music as so many strands of music were woven together. There was doo wop, rhythm and blues, barbershop music, pop, country, rock and roll, rockabilly, and plenty in-between. Radio stations were not hung up about musical genres. They played all kinds of music. The mantra was, “If it’s a hit, it plays.” The Daily Doo Wop goes beyond playing doo wop music, because that reflects the era.

The Daily Doo Wop blog has more than 250 posts with information about the great golden oldies music from this time, classic TV shows from what was called “the golden age of television,” pop culture (from TV tray tables to lava lamps), history (remember the race to space?), recipes (gotta love those casseroles and cakes), and more.

The Daily Doo Wop Rec Room has daily featured doo wop, rock and roll, R&B, or rockabilly songs that were hits during the first era of rock and roll. After a song is featured, it then goes into the juke box. You are welcome to listen to any of the 100+ selections there. The Rec Room also has a TV set. There are several selections, which are updated twice a week. You’ll find vintage TV series, game shows, cartoons and shorts, children’s programming, and commercials. They’re not called classic TV shows for nothing!

Every weekend, there is a Golden Oldies Juke Box Saturday, and the juke box is full of song requests of 1950s music and sixties music. Requests come mostly from those who see us on Facebook. There’s lots of fun on The Daily Doo Wop Facebook page every day.

There is also a Daily Doo Wop Youtube channel, to which you can subscribe. The Daily Doo Wop music channel has music videos from favorite doo wop groups, rock and roll hits, and more golden oldies music.

Music is one of the best ways to remember the past. It’s not always the lyrics to the song or the antics on a sitcom that are important. It’s that it makes you smile and you remember who you were with. It might be a grandmother who is no longer here or a brother, sister, friend. Maybe you heard a song at a dance or were in a car when you had your first kiss.