Recroom

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Doo Wop

The Fascinators came together as did many others by singing on street corners in New York City (for them, that was Brooklyn). Group members were Tony Passalacqua, Angelo LaGrecca, Nick Trivatto, Ed Wheeler, and George Cernacek. In the late 1950s, Capitol Records was a label that, with a few exceptions, was not releasing much doo wop or rock and roll. (Among the exceptions were Gene Vincent and The Five Keys.) However, the manager for The Fascinators had some connections there -- and the group was doing well locally. Capitol particularly wanted Passalacqua, but it was all of them or nothing. The group came out with "Chapel Bells" and "Who Do You Think You Are."  Those are fine doo wop recordings, but they did not sell that well nationally, although they were popular locally. Promotion issues, perhaps. It's hard to tell;  it's a tough business.

"Oh Rose Marie" came out in 1959 and didn't chart nationally much either. There are excellent vocals and (a sometimes-doo wop element) a  mid-song recitation of the singer's inner thoughts and feelings. The song was written by Joseph Passalacqua, Nick Trivato, George Cernacek, Angelo LaGrecca, and Ed Wheeler. Passalacqua went on to a career on his own and with others, recording as Tony Richards, Tony Mitchell, and Tony Pass.

Here are the lyrics to "Oh Rose Marie" by The Fascinators:

"Oh Rosemarie
Please won't you try
To give your love to me
Don't pass me by

Oh Rosemarie
I've waited so long
And babe p-lease
Don't say it's wrong

Oh Rosemarie
I have a little vow
No other love could be
I'll prove it now

Oh Rosemarie
I will never lie
To you eternally
My heart is tied

(Spoken)
Oh Rosemarie
For all my pleas
There's been no answer
But heart says please

(Spoken)
On what you do
My life depends
And with your answer
Love starts or ends

Oh Rosemarie
Please won't you try
To give your love to me
Don't pass me by

Oh Rosemarie
I've waited so long
And babe p-lease
Don't say it's wrong

Oh Rosemarie
I have a little vow
No other love could be
I'll prove it now

Oh oh oh ..."

For More Golden Oldies Music                                

The Daily Doo Wop Rec Room has daily featured doo wop music, rock and roll hits, R&B, or rockabilly songs that were hits during the first era of rock and roll (that is, from about 1952 until the British invasion in 1964). After a song is featured, it then goes into the juke box. You are welcome to listen to any of the 40+ selections there. Every weekend, there is a Golden Oldies Juke Box Saturday Night, and the juke box is full of song requests from the 1950s and 1960s.

Please click here for the Daily Doo Wop YouTube channel, to which you can subscribe. Thank you for stopping by The Daily Doo Wop. Hope you enjoyed "Oh Rose Marie" by The Fascinators.

The Rec Room has a featured song on the record player, 150+ songs in the juke box, and there are several Classic TV selections, as follows:

  1.  Make Room for Daddy, Season 2, Episode 1 titled “Family Troubles’ first aired September 28, 1954. As always, Danny Williams a successful nightclub singer, tries to balance his home and work wife. The show stars Danny Thomas, Jean Hagen, Sherry Jackson, Rusty Hamer, Louise Beavers, and Jesse White.The show was sponsored by Pall Mall cigarettes and Dodge. Commercials included. Running time: 29:30.
  2.  Clip from The Jack Paar Show from September 31, 1960. The show stars Jack Paar as host, of course. The guests are Charley Weaver, Hermione Gingold, and Shelley Berman. Running time 19:46.
  3. Mickey Mouse appears in Walt Disney’s animated short “Haunted House.” This was made in 1929. Cartoons and short films from earlier decades were often shown on TV in the 1950s, particularly in programming for children. Running time: 6:47.
  4.  Vintage (circa 1952) commercial for Wonder Breads. “Help Build Strong Bodies 8 Ways.” Running time: 1:00.

The Daily Doo Wop is a time machine to the first era of rock and roll. This starts around 1952 with the Eisenhower administration and goes until those longhaired Brits The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in February, 1964, and the music began to change. During this time of the 1950s and early 1960s, doo wop music, with its beautiful vocal harmonies, lyrics about love, and a host of nonsense syllables thrown in, was a signature sound. It was an exciting period in popular music as so many strands of music were woven together. There was doo wop, rhythm and blues, barbershop music, pop, country, rock and roll, rockabilly, and plenty in-between. Radio stations were not hung up about musical genres. They played all kinds of music. The mantra was, “If it’s a hit, it plays.” The Daily Doo Wop goes beyond playing doo wop music, because that reflects the era.

The Daily Doo Wop blog has more than 250 posts with information about the great golden oldies music from this time, classic TV shows from what was called “the golden age of television,” pop culture (from TV tray tables to lava lamps), history (remember the race to space?), recipes (gotta love those casseroles and cakes), and more.

The Daily Doo Wop Rec Room has daily featured doo wop, rock and roll, R&B, or rockabilly songs that were hits during the first era of rock and roll. After a song is featured, it then goes into the juke box. You are welcome to listen to any of the 100+ selections there. The Rec Room also has a TV set. There are several selections, which are updated twice a week. You’ll find vintage TV series, game shows, cartoons and shorts, children’s programming, and commercials. They’re not called classic TV shows for nothing!

Every weekend, there is a Golden Oldies Juke Box Saturday, and the juke box is full of song requests of 1950s music and sixties music. Requests come mostly from those who see us on Facebook. There’s lots of fun on The Daily Doo Wop Facebook page every day.

There is also a Daily Doo Wop Youtube channel, to which you can subscribe. The Daily Doo Wop music channel has music videos from favorite doo wop groups, rock and roll hits, and more golden oldies music.

Music is one of the best ways to remember the past. It’s not always the lyrics to the song or the antics on a sitcom that are important. It’s that it makes you smile and you remember who you were with. It might be a grandmother who is no longer here or a brother, sister, friend. Maybe you heard a song at a dance or were in a car when you had your first kiss.